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States ask EPA to defer greenhouse gas regs

A group of 21 attorneys general in the U.S., including South Carolina’s Alan Wilson, sent a letter to EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson asking her agency to put off a new greenhouse gas regulatory program.

Wilson says a delay would allow Congress to evaluate the necessity and timing of the regulations which affect the construction of a variety of buildings.

The EPA is causing state agencies to rapidly try to adjust and make themselves so that they can comply with these regulations, these over-reaching regulations that are going to control every aspects of our lives. This could even possibly have a ban on the construction of homes, of businesses, schools, churches, we’re talking about over-reaching of regulations here.

Wilson says it’s a back door attempt at capping and taxing emissions. “This is basically Cap and Trade administratively applied to the EPA. It failed last year in Congress and it’s the administration’s way of trying to get the same results they hope to do in Cap and Trade.”  He continued:

And when I speak with the other AG’s around the country, Republicans and Democrats, we all have our opinions, our environmental opinions on how we should regulate and interact with environmental policies. And some of us agree, and some of us disagree. But what we all agree on, at least all those signatories to this letter agree on, is that we need to defer, we’re not saying stop, we’re not saying never do, we need to defer until Congress has had a chance to fully vet the issue.

Wilson says Congress needs the opportunity to evaluate the regulations.

I believe, as do the other 20 Attorneys General, that Congress must study this matter and determine the long-term impact on our economy. And they can’t do that , Congress can’t do that unless the EPA ceases and desists with its regulatory implementation.

Wilson added that this is not the EPA’s job. “They’re the regulatory power, subject to the power of Congress. They execute the will of Congress. So, they should not be legislating through administrative fiat. And that is all we are saying in this letter.”

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Print This Story Print This Story Email This Story Email This Story

States ask EPA to defer greenhouse gas regs

A group of 21 attorneys general in the U.S., including South Carolina’s Alan Wilson, sent a letter to EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson asking her agency to put off a new greenhouse gas regulatory program.

Wilson says a delay would allow Congress to evaluate the necessity and timing of the regulations which affect the construction of a variety of buildings.

The EPA is causing state agencies to rapidly try to adjust and make themselves so that they can comply with these regulations, these over-reaching regulations that are going to control every aspects of our lives. This could even possibly have a ban on the construction of homes, of businesses, schools, churches, we’re talking about over-reaching of regulations here.

Wilson says it’s a back door attempt at capping and taxing emissions. “This is basically Cap and Trade administratively applied to the EPA. It failed last year in Congress and it’s the administration’s way of trying to get the same results they hope to do in Cap and Trade.”  He continued:

And when I speak with the other AG’s around the country, Republicans and Democrats, we all have our opinions, our environmental opinions on how we should regulate and interact with environmental policies. And some of us agree, and some of us disagree. But what we all agree on, at least all those signatories to this letter agree on, is that we need to defer, we’re not saying stop, we’re not saying never do, we need to defer until Congress has had a chance to fully vet the issue.

Wilson says Congress needs the opportunity to evaluate the regulations.

I believe, as do the other 20 Attorneys General, that Congress must study this matter and determine the long-term impact on our economy. And they can’t do that , Congress can’t do that unless the EPA ceases and desists with its regulatory implementation.

Wilson added that this is not the EPA’s job. “They’re the regulatory power, subject to the power of Congress. They execute the will of Congress. So, they should not be legislating through administrative fiat. And that is all we are saying in this letter.”

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