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Sheryl Crow Talks Nashville & Johnny Cash with Southern Living

Sheryl Crow Talks Nashville & Johnny Cash with Southern Living

Sheryl Crow’s 2013 album, Feels Like Home. Photo courtesy of Warner Bros. Nashville.

Sheryl Crow released her first country album, Feels Like Home, on September 10. She sat down with Southern Living magazine to talk about her first country project, what she would be doing if she wasn’t a singer and of course, living in Music City.

Read our review of Feels Like  Home >>

“When I moved here, it was the first time I felt like I found my home,” she said about Nashville. “I’m surrounded by people in the industry who approach their lives in a way where [the music] is work, it’s a job. It’s something that we love doing, but what comes first is family and community, and that’s what keeps this town feeling real to me.”

When it came time to record Feels Like Home, Sheryl’s friend Brad Paisley gave her the push she needed to take the plunge. “Brad Paisley was instrumental in getting this album made,” she said. “He’s just been a huge support system. He and his wife are my close friends, and our kids play together, so we have a strong bond outside of music. He came up to me and said, ‘You’ve really got to do this.’”

While Sheryl has already had success on the country chart with her single “Easy” ahead of the album release, she also had the honor of having Johnny Cash record one of her songs, “Redemption Day.” The song was one of the last things he recorded before passing away.

“Having Johnny Cash record one of my songs was my biggest accomplishment as a songwriter,” she said. “Talk about bringing weight to a song. He owned it. Afterward, he called me and asked if I liked his version and quizzed me about why I wrote ‘Redemption Day.’ But we never got to sing it together. He died three months later.”

If Sheryl wasn’t a successful singer/songwriter, she knows what she’d be doing. “If I wasn’t a musician, I would own an antiques store,” she said. “I love looking for stuff with a story, especially early-American pieces.”

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