Hall of Famer Ferlin Husky Hospitalized

Country Music Hall of Fame member Ferlin Husky has been admitted to the critical cardiac care unit at the Hendersonville Medical Center in Hendersonville, Tenn. Ferlin has been hospitalized before for heart and respiratory problems. Ferlin is known as one of the first crossover stars of the music industry. In the 1950s and 60s, Ferlin [...] Read More

2010 Rewind: No. 10 — Loretta Lynn’s 50th Leads Legends

It was quite a year for the Coal Miner’s Daughter — 2010 marked the 50th anniversary of Loretta Lynn’s emergence as a national star, and she was honored in a slew of ways, including parties, awards and a tribute album by some of today’s top artists. Loretta was joined by several other legends as 2010 honorees, including Merle Haggard, Jimmy Dean and now Dolly Parton. The recognition paid to the genre’s pioneering acts represents the No. 10 entry in our countdown of country music’s dozen top stories of the year. Loretta’s first single, “I’m A Honky Tonk Girl,” came out in 1960, and it seemed like every few months during 2010, the music business found some way to pay homage to her impact. Early in the year, she was accorded a Lifetime Achievement Grammy, though she was unable to attend the Los Angeles ceremony. “Coal Miner’s Daughter” was added to the National Recording Registry, she was saluted with an anniversary party at her Tennessee home, she was celebrated with a Reba McEntire-hosted Recording Academy Salute at the Ryman Auditorium, and a bunch of her classics were remade in the album Coal Miner’s Daughter: A Tribute To Loretta Lynn. That latter project brought Loretta the opportunity to sing the title track with Miranda Lambert and Sheryl Crow on the Country Music Association Awards. The album also features Lee Ann Womack, Kid Rock, the White Stripes, Alan Jackson and Carrie Underwood, among others. Loretta hand-picked all of the contributors — appropriate, because she’s not one of those veteran stars who dislikes newer versions of country music. Read More

You Say You Want a Revolution: Miranda Lambert, Blake Shelton Own CMAs

In a night that was short on surprises, Blake Shelton had one big moment that injected a shocking new name into the proceedings at the 44th annual Country Music Association Awards and helped keep some parity in his future family. As expected, Blake’s fiancee, Miranda Lambert, won Album of the Year from the CMA for Revolution, and she added to her first-time haul by picking up Female Vocalist and the Music Video trophy, for “The House That Built Me.” Not surprisingly, Blake’s “Hillbilly Bone,” a collaboration with Trace Adkins, also swiped the Musical Event of the Year. But when Blake took Male Vocalist of the Year in the show’s final hour — well, who the heck saw that coming? Certainly not Blake, who stood in a surreal state of disbelief before he stomped up the steps at the Bridgestone Arena to claim his prize. Read More

Chuck Wicks, Chris Young Help GAC Kick Off CMA Festival

“I feel like an old man.” A limping Chuck Wicks laughed off an injury Wednesday morning as he took a stage in the lobby of the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum to sing four songs and welcome a contingent of fans to Nashville. Chuck, Chris Young, Joey + Rory and Love and Theft took part in the third annual GAC Fan Breakfast, an adjunct event to the CMA Music Festival, which officially began with a parade just a few hours later. It wasn’t Chuck’s first public moment of the week. He took part Monday in the City of Hope Celebrity Softball Challenge, joining Joe Nichols, David Nail, Vince Gill and others on the “After Midnite With Blair Garner” team, which defeated the Grand Ole Opry squad 15-10. Chuck unfortunately got a raspberry chasing a ball, and the wound still stung Wednesday a.m., explaining his hobbling entrance at the Hall of Fame. Read More

Hank Williams, Chet Atkins, Willie Nelson: Hall of Famers Get More Honors

When Ferlin Husky and producer Billy Sherrill were inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame on Sunday, CMA Chairman Steve Moore called Hall membership “the highest honor in country music.” But the rewards don’t stop coming just because you’ve reached the pinnacle. In fact, several members of the Hall of Fame — including Hank Williams, Willie Nelson and Chet Atkins — continue to be remembered for their impact on American culture. Read More