ICM Faith, Family & Country Awards Nominees Announced

The nominees for the 18th Annual ICM Faith, Family & Country Awards have been announced. Dedicated to honoring and showcasing the biggest names and emerging talent among artists who perform Inspirational Country Music, the awards will take place Oct. 18 at Schermerhorn Symphony Center in Nashville. In addition to the awards, the Inspirational Country Music [...] Read More

GAC’s Nan Kelley & Storme Warren, Josh Turner & Others Part of Benefit Concert

The Colon Cancer Alliance announces the 3rd Annual “Stars Go Blue” benefit concert for colon cancer at the Country Music Hall of Fame this Wednesday, March 16, 2011. The event benefits the Blue Note Fund, which provides financial support for colon cancer patients in need of financial assistance. The theme of this year’s show is “Couples [...] Read More

Josh Turner, Linda Davis & GAC’s Nan Kelley to Hold Cancer Benefit

The Colon Cancer Alliance announces the 3rd Annual “Stars Go Blue” benefit concert for colon cancer at the Country Music Hall of Fame on Wednesday, March 16, 2011. The event benefits the Blue Note Fund, which provides financial support for colon cancer patients in need of financial assistance. The theme of this year’s show is [...] Read More

Brad Paisley, Little Jimmy Dickens Bring Opry House Full Circle

It’s a six-foot piece of circular wood, scuffed and nicked and grooved, but it’s a monumental symbol. Brad Paisley and Little Jimmy Dickens joined four construction workers Wednesday in installing a major piece of oak into the center of the stage at the Grand Ole Opry House. The moment was captured by a herd of reporters and photographers as Nashville continues its recovery from a devastating flood in early May. At that time, water from the Cumberland River swamped the historic venue, piling 46 inches of liquid on top of the stage. The waters were so significant that mud was hurled onto the ceiling and Opry VP and general manager Pete Fisher literally floated a kayak through the house. Dirt and construction dust still litter the grounds around the Opry House, but the placement of the circle back onto the stage was a hardy symbol for the restoration of the Opry and its history. The circle was cut from the floor of the Ryman Auditorium and installed at the Opry House when it opened in 1974, providing a physical link between current generations of Opry members and some of the late performers who stood behind the mic stand on that same wood — people like Hank Williams, Patsy Cline, Roy Acuff and Marty Robbins. It was damaged during May’s floods, but not so much that it couldn’t be repaired. Its resilience embodies as well as ever the durability of the Opry and its legend. Read More